Unmanned Aircraft Flying the Pacific Non-Stop In The 21st Century: Why It’s More Difficult Now Than Lindbergh’s Flight In 1927

11 May 2018
08:05

Unmanned Aircraft Flying the Pacific Non-Stop In The 21st Century: Why It’s More Difficult Now Than Lindbergh’s Flight In 1927

Flying non-stop across the Atlantic for Charles Lindbergh was difficult on the man, the machine and on technology. Once engine endurance improved, the only thing left to prove that cargo and passengers could move safely across the Atlantic – non-stop – with only human endurance as the last barrier to progress. The situation was ideal: air traffic was non-existent, obstacles were few. The two largest variables were the weather and Lindbergh’s ability to stay awake for 36 hours, relying on rudimentary celestial navigation and instruments to conduct his flight. While these were state-of-the-aviation-art, similar challenges exist today for the current state-of-the-art – even though automation has increased to the point where the Pacific Ocean can (and will be) traversed.